Tag Archives: ekklesia

It’s Time to Brag on the Bride of Christ

The church is not perfect. Never has been. Never will be. Not in this life.

That’s why I’m not surprised when folks go through a period of disillusionment with the church, even reveling in bitterness and cynicism. I’ve written two popular posts on this here and here.

As I’ve written before, experiencing a season of cynicism can actually bring forth a renewed vision of the church and a deeper commitment to the gospel if we are willing to let the Spirit transform our hearts. I’ve been there.

Are you upset at the hypocrisy and nominalism in the church? Are you tired of judgmental Christians who look more like the Pharisees than the Messiah from Nazareth? Fed up? Angry? Cynical? I get it. I really do.

So if this describes you, please allow me to speak very candidly.

I understand the cyclone of cynicism has blown through your life. But hear me… please. There is simply no excuse for isolating yourself from the saints and making yourself at home in your storm of bitterness.

Consider this before making any more slanderous attacks against Jesus’ fiancé.

In Acts 9 the very pious Saul of Tarsus, who had been “breathing out murderous threats” against the church, meets Jesus on his way to persecuting God’s people. All of this in the name of God. For the “love” of God.

Here is how Jesus responds to Saul’s words and actions in vs. 4-5:

“Saul, Saul, why do you persecute me?”
“Who are you, Lord?” Saul asked.
“I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting,” he replied.

Clearly, the language of the church being the body and bride of Christ are more than mere metaphors (1 Cor 12:27; Rev 21:9). Instead, they are ontological facts. It’s a mysterious new reality set forth in Scripture. I’m afraid that for many in the church this has become nothing more than theological jargon.

The words of Jesus to Saul are a sobering reminder that the church is not only the physical representation of Christ on the earth (i.e., what the church does she does as his ambassadors), but also that what is done to/against the church is done to/against Christ, the glorious bridegroom.

Therefore, we must be carefully aware of the aims in our criticisms.

Let’s be honest with ourselves. Do we seek to build up, or to tear down (2 Cor 13:10)? Saul became Paul. His very identity changed. He moved from tearing down to building up. What about you? Are you helping or hurting?

We need prophetic voices in the church, no doubt. But it’s a problem when every social networker and savvy blogger thinks they’re a prophet.

Have you noticed what happens when the majority thinks they’re a prophet? We end up lacking the edification of apostles, evangelists, pastors and teachers.

You may win some loyal fans and followers, but at what cost?

I admit that I’ve grown weary of the constant flow of criticisms (many of them unfounded) against the church from within by those who profess Christ as their Lord. It’s time to change the channel. We have to do better.

Whether you’re in an intentional community, a house church, or a larger organized fellowship, don’t give up meeting with the church (Heb 10:24-26).

Detach yourself from that which feeds your cynicism. Repent of the individualism that threatens the bond of Christian community. Reimagine the church with others. Get involved with broken people who need your real presence. For it is there you will find restoration for your own soul.

Trust not in blog posts and Facebook statuses to change the world. Instead, get involved in your local church. Bless the body of Christ. Be the hands and feet of Christ to your neighbors. Don’t wait. Do it now.

I pray you will find encouragement in the following video. Listen to the talented Greg Denie brag on the body of Christ… just to say thanks.

Are you walking with Christ in community? What are you doing to build up the Bride of Christ? Stand with her today in word and deed.

D.D. Flowers, 2014.

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The Community Life of God (Book Review)

The God Who Is Relationship

A Book Review of “The Community Life of God: Seeing the Godhead As the Model for All Relationships” by Milt Rodriguez

“God is not an individual” says Milt Rodriguez.  “He is a fellowship of three Persons; the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit” (p.14).

In The Community Life of God, Milt Rodriguez weaves together the story of God’s desire to plant himself in His people.  God’s image is a “communal” image.  The Lord created man in His image of community.  And taking from the Tree of Life (i.e. Christ) is to take from the relational God.

It was in the Garden of Eden that the serpent sought to keep God’s image from becoming a reality in the hearts of men.  The enemy of God presented man with individual living out of his own soul-life (i.e. will, emotions, intellect).  Instead of man pursuing spiritual living after taking from the communal life of God, he experiences separation from God and other men.

Rodriguez proposes that much of Christian activity today is spent furthering the individualistic mindset that is so popular in our culture.  Even when believers come together corporately there is not an understanding of God’s image among us.  Church life ought to be more than socializing and individual Christian ministries.

Milt writes, “Personhood and identity can only be defined by relating to others. You will never truly “find yourself” until you are living in the community life of God” (p.62)

What is the sort of fellowship the Lord desires among his ekklesia?

“This fellowship is the place where there is nothing to hide. Complete truthfulness and complete honesty rule here.  The Father, Son, and Spirit do not hold back anything from one another… there is no fear of loss” (p. 116).

As Christian Smith has written, “Community means more than having lots of meetings. It means jointly building a way of life, a group memory, and a common anticipated future.” (Going to the Root: Nine Proposals for Radical Church Renewal, p.2)

In order for us to experience the community life of God, we must embrace the cross.  Rodriguez says there “will be one brother or sister who rubs you the wrong way.”  It is there we embrace the cross and learn “they are part of the same body as you. You belong to them and they belong to you” (p.152).

Finally, this community life of God cannot work in meeting once a week.  We all know this to be true, but still we place other things before God’s heart.  We sacrifice the church on the altar of family, jobs, and personal ministries.

Milt says, “He (God) wants you and me and every other believer to be actively involved on a daily basis. This is why we were born.  This is why we live on this planet” (p.170).

Brothers and sisters, if we are going to participate in God’s eternal purpose, we must be intentional about our relationships within the local ekklesia of Christ.  We must give and receive sacrificially in order that we might know the God who is within Himself, relationship.

There have been many books written on the church being rooted in the Triune image of God, but this one delivers in a simple and easy-to-read presentation.  I recommend this book to all of those who are longing to discover that the church is born out of the very heart of the relational God.

What others are saying?

“This little book provides a clear window into the ultimate source of authentic body life. Delve into its pages and meet the God who is beyond what most of us have imagined, the God in whose collective voice all genuine churches echo.” –Frank Viola, author of Pagan Christianity, From Eternity to Here, and Finding Organic Church, www.frankviola.com

“I was deeply blessed, refreshed and challenged by this book. The author casts the spotlight on the reality and wonder that “God” is really the community life of three persons – a fact virtually untouched in traditional theology. Milt shows from various angles how the community life of God is the foundation of our organic ekklesia life together in Christ.”–Jon Zens, Editor, Searching Together; author of A Church Building Every ½ Mile and “What’s With Paul & Women? www.searchingtogether.org

Milt Rodriguez

Milt Rodriguez has been living in and planting organic expressions of church since 1990. He has also authored several books including The Butterfly in You and The Temple Within.  He currently lives with his wife Mary in Gainesville, Flordia.  He is a dear brother in the Lord and I am happy to call him my friend.


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