Tag Archives: blend of folk and hip-hop

Josh Garrels on Believing

Josh Garrels is a singer-songwriter living in Portland, Oregon. He is the founder of independent label Small Voice Records.           Garrels has released six albums, including the critically acclaimed, fan-financed 2011 release      Love & War & the Sea In Between.

The making of Love & War & the Sea In Between was completely funded through the support of listeners and offered as a free download for one year, garnering 125,000 downloads in the first year after its release.

Named the number one album of 2011 by Christianity Today, the magazine described the recording as, “prophetic, incisive, achingly human, and longingly spiritual.”

From joshgarrels.com:

Garrels has spent more than a decade crafting music that cuts clean through. Resting in the space between accessibility and honesty, Garrels’ songs wrestle with and celebrate the mystery of faith with authenticity and heart. Cultivating a genre-blending mix of folk and hip hop, Garrels’ music explores themes of compassion, hope, longing, and liberation.

I believe that Garrels’ music is boldly prophetic, yet creatively introspective and mystical. His provocative lyrics are deeply theological and refreshingly honest. In many ways, Garrels’ courage personally reminds me of Keith Green and Rich Mullins, who were both pioneers as Christian artists.

Like Green and Mullins, Garrels’ music comes from deep within his soul, and you feel it. If you haven’t heard his music, I encourage you to check him out and see if Christ doesn’t minister to you in his rhythms.

In the following video, Garrels talks about believing in the one who created you, following the Christ who gives you the Kingdom, and committing for the long haul… “because not many people are ending well.”

Is this the first time you’ve heard of Garrels, or are you already a fan of his music? If you’re already familiar with him, what do you think about his unique style of music ministry? Do you find his words on believing inspirational? Why do you think so many people are not ending well?

D.D. Flowers, 2012.


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